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Jun
2016
Saturday 25th
posted by Will Stone in Britain

Revellers join in for Sean Taylor track singalong


GLASTONBURY revellers staged a mass performance of a new ballad in support of blacklisted workers as the festival got under way.

The Blacklist Support Group’s campaign song, penned by singer-songwriter Sean Taylor, was released earlier this month and is set to become an anthem of the movement.

Its chorus goes: “Brother we’ve got your name and number, sister there ain’t nowhere to run.

“If you want to try and be a hero, you’ll find yourself on Blacklist No 1.”

All the money raised from sales of the track will be donated to the anti-blacklisting campaign.

Blacklist Support Group’s Dave Smith, who orchestrated Thursday’s singalong, addressed the crowd at the festival’s speakers’ forum.

He told them that, although this year has seen a victory for blacklisted workers in securing compensation from construction firms, the practice continues to cast a shadow over the lives of victims and their families.

Police surveillance of blacklisted workers and other activists, which is the subject of a major government inquiry into undercover policing, was also discussed.

Activist Helen Steel, who was duped into a long-term relationship with undercover police officer John Dines, spoke at the festival yesterday.

She told the Star: “I think everyone who has been spied on has the right to know what was happening.

“The public has a right to know what has been done in their name. If we want to stop these abusive practices happening, we need to know the truth.”

Ms Steel added that she also knows of cases where a female undercover officer has had relationships with male activists, but none to her knowledge has been long term.

This week, the Pitchford Inquiry highlighted the need to inform family members when undercover police use the identities of dead children.

Failing to do so may be a breach of their human rights, warned inquiry chairman Sir Christopher Pitchford.

Mr Dines assumed the identity of a dead child called John Barker before embarking on a two-year relationship with the McLibel activist.




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