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Jul
2016
Monday 18th
posted by Lamiat Sabin in Britain

THE search for the bodies of three workers killed in the collapse of the Didcot A power station is to resume now that the rest of the building has been knocked down, it was revealed yesterday.

Demolition workers Ken Cresswell, 57, and John Shaw, 61, both from Rotherham, South Yorkshire, and Chris Huxtable, 34, from Swansea, south Wales, were buried under 20,000 tons of rubble when the power station unexpectedly came crashing down on February 23.

Four people died, but only the body of 53-year-old Michael Collings, from Teesside, has been recovered so far. The cause of the tragedy remains unknown.

Work to demolish the rest of the decommissioned site started yesterday using 10 remote-controlled robots and explosives. Teams then began to search the rubble.

Thames Valley Police said in a statement: “The absolute priority of our multi-agency response remains the recovery of the missing men, so they can be returned to their families, and to understand what caused this tragic incident.”

A 50-metre exclusion zone was set up around what was left of the building to avoid any more fatal accidents.

A four-month delay in completing the demolition was necessary to ensure safety, said explosives contractor Roland Alford.

He said: “There has been quite a lot of criticism about delays … but the fact is nothing like this has ever been attempted before and this is not a simple demolition.”

Mr Alford added: “It was almost unthinkable to send people to work underneath there and place charges, given the fact the building could come down at any moment. You legally can’t justify that.”




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