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May
2017
Monday 8th
posted by Lamiat Sabin in Britain

Labour leader says it’s all still to play for on June 8


LABOUR is pressing on with its campaign and “fighting to win” the general election after the “disappointing” local elections last week, Jeremy Corbyn said yesterday.

The Labour leader acknowledged last Thursday’s polls had been a let-down, but said Tory gains had been largely down to the collapse of Ukip.

But he refused to answer the channel’s baiting questions about his leadership.

“I’ve been elected to lead this party and I’m very proud to do so. I’m very proud of the increase in our membership and the increase in our party activity.

“Obviously, I am disappointed in the election results on Thursday.

“We’re going all out to elect Labour MPs on June 8. After that, we’ll see what the result is.”

He made a plea to former Ukip voters who turned to the Tories to think of what kind of country they and their families would want to live in.

He said: “Do they want to live in a society where the health service is underfunded, where schools have to have collections from the parents to pay for the teachers and there is a growing housing crisis, or do they want a Labour alternative, which is fair taxation for those who can afford to pay it?”

And in a speech in Leicester on Saturday, Mr Corbyn warned that many voters would be sucked in by the “Tories’ fearmongering and spin machine” that would make them “settle for less than they should.”

He said they are underestimating how much more damage the Tories could inflict through ignoring low and middle-income earners as well as those who would rely on care services.

“We know from local election results that the gap between us and the Tories is not as great as the pundits have been saying,” he said. “But we still have many people to convince.”

Meanwhile, the Lib Dems risked angering better-off pensioners by announcing a plan to ditch the winter fuel payment for over-65s who have incomes of more than about £45,000.




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