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Mar
2017
Wednesday 8th
posted by in Features

by Cristel Amiss and Lisa Longstaff


THE anti-rape movement shook India in December 2012 and Argentina and Latin America in 2015-16.

The rapes and murders were not new, but women’s massive response was — it spread like wildfire, mobilising millions and exposing the complicity of government and other institutions in allowing and even encouraging rape and murder, and preventing victims from getting justice.

In Argentina, the Ni Una Menos (Not One Less) movement was formed after a pregnant 14-year-old Chiara Paez was found murdered by her boyfriend. Other victims followed, including 16-year-old Lucia Perez who was gang raped and tortured and died of her injuries.

Not only were women and children not protected, but there was not even a record of how many were being murdered.

Similarly, in Britain police, social services, Parliament, local authorities and the Church were shown to have protected rapists and other violent men. We still don’t know how many victims there are. New ones are uncovered daily.

Women who come forward risk disbelief and even jail: Layla Ibrahim was imprisoned after she reported an attack by two strangers in the north of England.

Erioth Mwesigwa, who fled after gang rape in Uganda, was detained and threatened with deportation, until a massive public campaign stopped it.

The IWS has given victims of violence an international platform to protest against these injustices and demand action.

Today we will be exposing that:

- Record numbers of children are taken into care at a time when victims of historic child abuse are speaking out about the years of rape they suffered when in care, having been dismissed as liars or fantasists responsible for their own abuse.




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