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More people buying less food due to cost-of-living crisis

Office for National Statistics finds that 41% of adults cutting back on grocery shopping

THE number of people buying less food due to the cost-of-living crisis has dramatically soared over the past month, according to damning new figures.

The latest survey by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) found that 41 per cent of adults reported cutting back on their grocery shop due to the rising costs.

The figure, taken between April 27 and May 8, is an increase on the 39 per cent in the previous survey carried out in April.

Around 88 per cent of adults have reported a rise in their cost of living over the past month, the ONS said.

Labour’s Kim Johnson told the Star: “This is a political choice for the Tories, who seem more interested in supporting big business and profits over people.

“There were 38 new Bills in the Queen’s Speech this week but nothing on how they plan to support millions facing a very bleak future.”

Labour MP Diane Abbott said: “It is awful that so many people are having to cut back on food shopping.

“But even worse is Tory indifference to the grim reality of life for so many millions of British people.”

The figures come as major supermarkets Tesco, Asda, Sainsbury’s, Morrisons and Aldi all hiked the cost of more than 100 value range items during April, making it even more difficult for households to cope.

Foods, such as vegetables, coffee, fresh meat and cheese, rose by up to 30 per cent.

Consumer expert Scott Dixon said: “Consumers will have noticed that many of the goods they buy on a weekly basis have shot up in price.

“I have noticed that it’s often in 5p increments on lower-priced items and anywhere between 10p to 30p on the mainstream products, which hides the real impact of inflation being inflicted on consumers.”

Age UK charity director Caroline Abrahams said: “Significant numbers of older people are already struggling, cutting back on meals and buying cheaper alternatives to save where they can.

“But the strain on their income will only get worse towards the end of year as they use more energy to keep their homes warm.”

A Tesco spokesperson said that the company has added 100 new products to their value range in the past week while a Sainsbury’s spokesperson said: “The cost of individual products is determined by a number of factors and prices can fluctuate, both up and down, as a consequence.”

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